anti-hegemony:

anti-hegemony:

anti-hegemony:

Why are there (intelligent) people in the world who think terrorism is a real threat that should (and can) be controlled by government, and/but epidemic or plague is just fine and leavable to “individual liberty?”

Reblog if you’d like to…

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Afrofuturism in the Time of Renisha and Trayvon • VMF Magazine

chrilliamsdotcom:

“What’s more beautiful about the overarching philosophy of Afrofuturism is the homage it pays to Black history and the innate ‘swag’ of Black folk. Afrofuturism doesn’t just dwell in a time unknown, it reaches back and uplifts the past as a means of securing our future. Artists often revisit the mythos of Egypt and the spiritual realm of the Yoruba faith for inspiration. Shamans, griots, and warriors, once again, take their places of importance in these societies. Magic and spiritual power live in harmony with science and technology, an ideology not unfamiliar to indigenous African philosophical thought systems.”

Afrofuturism in the Time of Renisha and Trayvon • VMF Magazine

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jean-luc-gohard:

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: the whole “GMOs are bad for you” propaganda is distracting from the real problem with GMOs, which is the economically exploitative business model of Monsanto and other companies which specialize in that field. We’ve been genetically…

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Religion in the Time of Superintelligence

So. We’re still doing that whole “Westernized Manichean Good Vs Evil Original Sin Theology Will Be A Thing A Machine Consciousness Cares
About Unless We Convince It That It Should” thing, then?

All right, I
guess, but mightn’t it do us a world of good to try some non-dual,
non-western approaches to a notion of both the self and moral
responsibility? Something like the principles of Buddhism and Taoism,
where the self/Soul is an interconnected and interdependent expression
of elements of universal change, which survival depends on the
maintenance of the whole, rather than a set of post-death rewards?

I
mean, if we’re going to apply the principles of religious scholarship to
the theorizing about and development OF machine minds, then let’s do
some deep, DEEP diving here, rather that retreading the same old ground.​

Religion in the Time of Superintelligence

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Ladies in Spaaace: Feminism in Bitch Planet and ODY-C – Panels

comicweek:

If you’ve been following House DeFraction (as Kelly Sue DeConnick and Matt Fraction are affectionately and collectively known), you’ve probably heard about their two newest titles with Image. In November, Matt Fraction and Christian Ward’s ODY-C came out with its first issue; on January 28, Kelly Sue DeConnick launched Bitch Planet with artist Valentine De Landro. Both are two issues in, and present compelling new takes on feminism in comics storytelling.

At first glance (and second, for that matter), they couldn’t be more different. In ODY-C, women make the rules; in Bitch Planet, they are entirely subject to them. Bitch Planet is told exclusively through conversation, whereas ODY-C has dual narratives: formalist exposition and colloquial dialogue. Valentine De Landro’s art captures the grittiness of urban life and incarceration, and Cris Peter utilizes a muted color palette that gives Bitch Planet a chilly feel. Christian Ward’s art for ODY-C, on the other hand, regularly qualifies as psychedelic, and the man is definitely not afraid of neon. Where DeConnick takes our current society, dials the misogynist messages up to 11, and adds a prison planet, Fraction is fusing classical mythology with a twisted futuristic setting.

The universe of ODY-C is female by divine mandate. In this gender-swapped version of the Odyssey, Zeus tires of the inevitable and interminable generational struggles and wipes out all men. But life finds a way — in this case, with Promethene’s creation of a new gender, the sebex, who are instrumental to propagating the species. The birth of the first male child in ten thousand millennia is the trigger for the Troiian War, the conclusion of which sends our hero Odyssia on her long and troubled journey home. So what does feminism mean in a universe 99.99% women? Fraction’s ambiguous use of pronouns and body characteristics create a spectrum and fluidity of gender and diversity that is both marvelous and confusing to behold.

READ the rest of Jenn Norton’s article on Panels

Ladies in Spaaace: Feminism in Bitch Planet and ODY-C – Panels

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